Cubitus Valgus: Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, Prevention, & More - Healthroid

Cubitus Valgus: Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, Prevention, & More

Priyank Pandey
Written by Priyank Pandey on September 12, 2022

Cubitus valgus, also known as “gunstock deformity” or “bowlegs,” is a condition in which the forearm is angled outward at the elbow. This deformity can be congenital (present at birth) or acquired (developing later in life). Cubitus valgus can lead to functional problems with the arm and hand and can be cosmetically displeasing. Treatment options for cubitus valgus include surgery, bracing, and physical therapy.

Causes

Cubitus valgus, also known as “gunstock deformity,” is a condition in which the forearm is angled outward at the elbow. The condition can be congenital (present at birth) or acquired (due to injury or disease).

Congenital causes of cubitus valgus include Turner syndrome and Noonan syndrome. Turner syndrome is a chromosomal disorder that affects only girls and causes a variety of physical abnormalities, including cubitus valgus. Noonan syndrome is another genetic disorder that can cause cubitus valgus, as well as other skeletal abnormalities.

Fractures are the most common acquired cause of cubitus valgus. A fracture of the distal radius (the bone in the forearm near the wrist) is the most common type of fracture associated with this condition.

Symptoms

Cubitus valgus, also known as “gunstock deformity” is a condition that results in the forearm angling outwards at the elbow. The symptoms of cubitus valgus include pain and tenderness at the elbow, weakness in the forearm muscles, and decreased range of motion in the elbow. In severe cases, the deformity can result in ulnar nerve entrapment, which can cause numbness and tingle in the hand. Treatment for cubitus valgus typically involves wearing a splint or brace to hold the forearm in position and physical therapy to stretch and strengthen the muscles around the elbow. Surgery is sometimes necessary to correct the deformity.

Diagnosis

There are several tests that can be used to diagnose cubitus valgus. The most common is the X-ray. This can show the deformity of the bones in the elbow. Other tests that may be used include a CT scan or an MRI. These can show the soft tissue around the elbow and how it is affected by the deformity.

Cubitus Valgus

Treatment

Cubitus valgus is a condition that results in the bending of the elbow. The most common treatment for this condition is surgery. There are two types of surgery that can be used to treat cubitus valgus: osteotomy and fixation.

Osteotomy is a type of surgery that involves cutting and resetting the bone. This type of surgery is typically used for children who have mild to moderate cubitus valgus. The surgeon will make an incision in the elbow and then cut the bone above or below the elbow joint. The bone will then be reset at a new angle and held in place with screws, plates, or wires.

Fixation is a type of surgery that involves using metal hardware to hold the bones in place. This type of surgery is typically used for adults who have severe cubitus valgus.

Prevention

Cubitus valgus, or “smiling elbow,” is a deformity of the elbow joint. The condition is caused by an imbalance in the muscles and bones around the elbow joint. This can lead to pain and decreased range of motion in the elbow joint.

There are several ways to prevent cubitus valgus. First, it is important to maintain good muscle balance around the elbow joint. This can be done through regular stretching and strengthening exercises. Second, avoid activities that put undue stress on the elbow joint, such as repetitive motions or impact sports. If you must participate in these activities, be sure to use proper technique and warm up beforehand. Finally, see a doctor if you experience any pain or stiffness in your elbow joint. Early treatment can help prevent further damage to the joint.

Risk Factors

There are several risk factors for Cubitus valgus, including:

-Prolonged use of crutches or other walking aids

-Injury or trauma to the elbow joint

-Arthritis in the elbow joint

-Birth defects or genetic conditions that affect bone development

People who have any of these risk factors may be more likely to develop Cubitus valgus. In some cases, the condition may be unavoidable. However, it is important to take measures to protect the elbow joint and reduce the risk of further injury.

Complications

There are a few potential complications associated with cubitus valgus, though they are relatively rare. If the deformity is severe, it can lead to ulnar nerve entrapment, which can cause numbness and tingle in the hands. In some cases, the ulnar artery may become compressed, which can lead to blood flow problems. Arthritis is also a potential complication of cubitus valgus. The deformity can put undue stress on the elbow joint, leading to pain and inflammation. Treatment for these complications typically involves surgery to correct the deformity.

When to see a doctor?

There is no definitive answer to when one should see a doctor for Cubitus valgus, as the condition can vary greatly in severity. However, it is generally advisable to seek medical attention if the deformity is causing pain or restricting the range of motion. Additionally, if the deformity is severe enough to cause cosmetic concerns, patients may also wish to consult with a doctor. In general, cubitus valgus is a relatively benign condition that does not require treatment unless it is causing significant discomfort.

Conclusion

While there is no agreed-upon cause of Cubitus valgus, the most common theory is that it is caused by genetic factors. However, there is no definitive evidence to support this claim.

There are a number of treatment options available for Cubitus valgus, but the effectiveness of each option varies from person to person. Some common treatments include physical therapy, orthotic devices, and surgery.

Overall, Cubitus valgus is a relatively harmless condition that can be treated effectively in most cases. However, if left untreated, it can lead to pain and discomfort.

Published on September 12, 2022 and Last Updated on September 12, 2022 by: Mayank Pandey

Priyank Pandey
Written by Priyank Pandey on September 12, 2022

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