Canker Sore: Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, Prevention, Complications, & More

Priyank Pandey
Written by Priyank Pandey on August 01, 2022

A canker sore is a small, painful ulcer that appears on the inside of your mouth. They are often white or yellow in color and surrounded by a red border. Canker sores can make it difficult to eat and speak. While their cause is unknown, they are thought to be triggered by stress, food allergies, or hormonal changes. Treatment includes taking over-the-counter pain medications and using mouth rinses or gels that contain benzocaine or lidocaine.

Causes

Canker sores are a common problem, affecting as many as 1 in 5 people. But what causes them? While the exact cause is unknown, there are several factors that may contribute to their development. Canker sores are more common in people who have suffered from prolonged stress or anxiety. Stress can cause the body to produce more acid, which may irritate the tongue and lead to a sore. Some people develop canker sores due to a family history of these mouth ulcers. The most common cause is the use of certain medications, including antibiotics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), or pain medications. Canker sores typically first appear on the tongue, but can also appear on the lips and inside the mouth. They are painless and cannot be seen by others.

Symptoms

Canker sores are a common ailment, affecting an estimated 20% of the population. The sores are typically small, red, and painful ulcers that form on the inside of the mouth. They can make it difficult to eat and speak. Canker sores are not contagious, but their cause is unknown. Some possible triggers include stress, food allergies, and hormonal changes. Treatment typically includes over-the-counter pain medications and mouth rinses.

Diagnosis

Canker sores, also known as aphthous ulcers, are small, painful ulcers that can develop on the inside of your mouth. While anyone can get them, they’re more common in people who have a weakened immune system. There’s no cure for canker sores, but there are treatments that can help make them go away faster.

If you think you have canker sores, your doctor will likely do a physical exam and ask about your medical history. He or she may also order tests to rule out other causes of your symptoms. The most common test for diagnosing canker sores is a biopsy, which involves removing a small piece of tissue from the area where the sore is located so it can be examined under a microscope.

Treatment

Canker sores are a common oral health problem that can affect anyone. While there is no one cure for canker sores, there are treatments that can help make them go away faster. Treatment options include over-the-counter and prescription medications, as well as natural remedies. Antibiotics Canker sores are caused by an infection with bacteria, so you may be prescribed antibiotics to treat the infection. These medications work by killing the bacteria that cause canker sores. Over-the-counter (OTC) pain medications can also be used to treat canker sores. The recommended dose of OTC pain medicines is typically 500 to 1,000 milligrams (mg) per day. If you are more than 12 hours without taking the medicine, you should talk to your doctor before resuming use. Topical anesthetics are available by prescription. These medications are usually available in the form of gels, sprays, or creams. They can be applied directly to open sores or around them.

Prevention

Canker sores, also known as aphthous ulcers, are a common problem for many people. They can be painful and often recur. While the cause of canker sores is not entirely clear, there are some things that can be done to help prevent their development. One of the most important things is to avoid putting stress on the lips and mouth. This includes avoiding hard or sharp foods and drinks, and not biting the inside of the mouth. Other measures that can help include using a soft toothbrush, avoiding acidic foods and drinks, and rinsing with salt water or mouthwash after eating. In some cases, taking supplements such as zinc or B-12 may be helpful in preventing canker sores.

Complications

Canker sores are a common complaint, but what are the complications of having canker sores? People with canker sores may have difficulty eating and drinking because the sore makes it difficult to speak or swallow. Canker sores can also be painful and may interfere with sleep. In some cases, canker sores may become infected, leading to a condition called cellulitis. Cellulitis is a serious infection that requires treatment with antibiotics.

Conclusion

Canker sores are a common problem for many people. There are a variety of ways to treat them, but there is no one definitive cure. Some people find that certain treatments work better for them than others. There are also some home remedies that can be used to help speed the healing process. In most cases, canker sores will heal on their own within a week or two. Canker sores are not contagious, but they may be related to other conditions. If you think that canker sores might be linked to another condition, see your doctor for an accurate diagnosis.

Priyank Pandey
Written by Priyank Pandey on August 01, 2022

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